Healthy Home welcomes 2000th visitor

Rochester’s Healthy Home, a hands-on museum that teaches people how to reduce environmental hazards in their homes, welcomed Vonjula Thompson as its 2000thvisitor on July 8.  Vonjula is a Work Experience Program (WEP) intern.  She is part of the county-funded WEP program co-located at the Healthy Home that helps people transition from public assistance into the workplace.  The Healthy Home tour is part of the first day of orientation for all of the WEP interns, many of whom have small children and live in homes with high risks of home hazards.  Since it opened in June 2006, the Healthy Home has educated residents, property owners, health care providers, community groups, and many others about home-based hazards such as lead, asthma triggers, carbon monoxide, household toxins, and others.  The Healthy Home is a partnership of the SouthWest Area Neighborhood Association, the Rochester Fatherhood Resource Initiative, and the University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center. 

Nora Herbert (WEP Director @ the Healthy Home), Vonjula Thompson (WEP Intern), Dot Gulardo (Healthy Home Program Manager)

Advertisements

July 14, 2008 at 12:48 pm Leave a comment

In the News: Cancer Rates and Education and Obesity and Diabetes

Two new studies of interest out today.  The first links cancer rates and socioeconomic status, particularly education.  Researchers associate the drop in cancer rates among well educated (people with at least 16 years of education) to better prevention/screening and declines in smoking.  You can read a Reuters story on the study here.

The childhood obestiy epidemic could have a lasting legacy of a growing number of adults with diabetes.   You can read a HealthDay story on the Michigan study here.

July 8, 2008 at 4:21 pm Leave a comment

Study: Diet During Pregnancy and Obesity in Children Linked

A British study in rats has revealed that eating an unhealthy diet during pregnancy raises the lifetime risk of obesity and elevated cholesterol and blood sugar levels in offspring.

URMC childhood obesity expert Stephen Cook, M.D. commented on the study, which appears in the Journal of Physiology, in a WebMD story:

“A lot of information suggests that in-utero exposures can lead to long-lasting effects in children.  Women who smoke during pregnancy have children who are heavier, so maternal patterns can affect a child’s weight. Whether the cause is altered metabolism or something else, it is a very real concern.”

You can read the entire WebMD story here.

July 2, 2008 at 10:39 am Leave a comment

2008 Summer in the City Series Schedule

The Summer in the City Series, a joint program of the Center for Community Health and the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine, has released its schedule for 2008.  The series consists of lunch-hour discussion on a variety of public health topics.

Unless noted, the discussions are from 12:00 to 1:00 PM and are held in Room K-307 in the Medical Center and include a light lunch.  The schedule is as follows:

July 8: Health-e-Access: Using Technology to Increase Care for Children

Ken McConnochie, M.D., MPH, director, Health-e-Access Telemedicine Network and professor of Pediatrics (Please note that this session only is scheduled 12:15 to 1:15 pm)

July 15:  Nourishing our Neighborhoods

Chris Hartman, co-manager, South Wedge Farmers’ Market

Eleanor Coleman, Southwest Area Neighborhood Association

Katrina Korfmacher, Ph.D., community outreach coordinator; research assistant professor, Environmental Health Sciences Center

July 22: Creating Urban Villages in the Rochester Children’s Zone (RCZ)

Ellen Lewis, interim team leader, RCZ

Rev. Glenn Alexander, pastor, Holy City International Church of God in Christ; board member, RCZ; Sector 10 Co-Chair, North East Neighborhood Alliance

July 29: Teen Smart Driving: What Parents Should Know

Anne Brayer, M.D., associate professor of Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics

Lynn Babcock-Cimpello, M.D., associate professor of Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics, co-directors, Injury Free Coalition for Kids of Rochester

For more information: CenterforCommunityHealth@urmc.rochester.edu or 276-3056

July 1, 2008 at 1:39 pm 1 comment

Rochester’s New Lead Law

Dr Katrina Smith Korfmacher recently published an article in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice  on Rochester’s Lead Law and the Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning.

Abstract:  In December 2005, the City Council of Rochester, New York, passed an amendment to its municipal code requiring inspection for and correction of lead hazards. Local lead-poisoning prevention advocates had long recognized the need for stronger lead policy to address Rochester’s high rate of childhood lead poisoning. Between 2000 and 2005, a diverse coalition of educators, healthcare professionals, community members, researchers, government officials, and many others worked to develop a strategy for ending childhood lead poisoning in Rochester by 2010. Their experience in defining the issue, mustering resources, and structuring their decision-making processes is informative for other communities seeking to overcome barriers to improved primary prevention policy.

 

June 25, 2008 at 8:19 am Leave a comment

Health Disparities in Rochester: What Needs to be Done

In a follow-up to the previous post (Report Details Disparities in Care), Nancy Bennett, M.D. and Wade Norwood have written a piece that appeared in today’s Democrat & Chronicle. Bennett is director of the URMC Center for Community Health and Norwood is director of Community Engagement for the Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency.

The piece (which appears below) addresses the underlying factors behind disparities in our community, the progress that has been made, and the challenges that remain.

Spread good health to all corners of Rochester

Dr. Nancy Bennett and Wade Norwood

In the World Health Organization’s comparison of the health of nations, the United States ranks 24th, below most industrialized nations. However, the United States spends more per capita, and our expenditures are rising faster than those in any other country. While the reasons for this paradox are many, one critical factor is the persistence of health disparities based on race, ethnicity and socioeconomic status.

To improve our country’s health, we must improve the health of our most vulnerable populations. While we all are cared for by the same health systems, white suburban populations enjoy relatively good health, but poor urban and rural populations do not.

One example of these horrible inequalities was reported this month by the Dartmouth Atlas Project: African Americans are more likely to suffer leg amputations than white people.

The reasons for such differences are complex.

  • African Americans have higher rates of obesity and smoking, putting them at greater risk for diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, heightening the risk of amputation.
  • African Americans are likely to have poorer access to primary and specialty care, which might improve the management of chronic disease, thus preventing complications.
  • African Americans often have poorer access to advanced surgical alternatives to amputation.

Although these differences may be related to the adequacy of insurance, studies have shown that differences remain even when coverage is equal. We need to understand, through public health and health services research, the complexities of this pathway so that we can eliminate inequalities.

(more…)

June 18, 2008 at 2:35 pm Leave a comment

Report Details Racial Disparities in Care

The Dartmouth Atlas Project has released a report titled Disparities in Health and Health Care Among Medicare Beneficiaries.  While disparities in care are generally associated with race and socioeconomic factors, the Dartmouth report reveals that geography also plays an important role.  The report examines geographic disparities in the rates of leg amputations (a complication of diabetes), screening for breast cancer and diabetes, the prevalence of primary care physicians, and ambulatory care vs. hospitalization rates. You can read a NY Times article on the report here.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation used the data in the report as a platform to announce $300 million in new grants to fight health disparities.

The Democrat and Chronicle reports on the Rochester numbers in the report (full article after the jump) and notes that that while progress has been made in areas such as immunizations and mammograms, disparities in diabetes care remain.  According to the most recent Monroe County Adult Health Survey, 20 percent of African Americans in the county have diabetes – more than twice the number of whites and Latinos.

(more…)

June 9, 2008 at 12:20 pm 1 comment

Older Posts Newer Posts


Categories

  • Blogroll

  • Feeds